Share this on...

When: November 2014 – April 2016

Where: Baynard House – Blackfriars

What: The civil engineering arm of the Livett’s Group began work at Baynard House – Blackfriars in November 2014 to assist BAM Nuttall in the relocation of the water cooling intake shaft for British Telecom. This operation continued up until April 2016, culminating in the removal of the sheet piles from the river.

How – the construction: A cofferdam was constructed as engineers carried out the work in anticipation of the repositioning of the Blackfriars Pier downstream. With such extensive work taking place at the site throughout the project, a vast amount of bulky and unusual loads had to be transported to and from the Herbosch Kiere jack up barge which moored alongside the cofferdam.

baynard-house-livetts_3

A marine logistics centre was established at Thames Wharf Silvertown in order to facilitate the frequent transportation of necessary civil engineering equipment via water, avoiding hundreds of lorry movements in central London

How – the de-rig: As part of the de-rig of the operations at Baynard House, the cofferdam installed to carry out the works needed to be removed. Initially, this was attempted by the crane on the jack up barge, which failed owing to the sheet piles having sunk into the Thames’ riverbed.

baynard-house-livetts_1

From here, the Scheldemond I was called into action. This vessel was ideal for the operation, as she has the necessary functionality to carry out the task – including spud legs to fix her into position, a deck big enough to manage all required equipment, and an on board HIAB crane capable of lifting the sheet piling onto her deck.

Divers working on the project used the Scheldemond I as a platform to both store all their essential equipment and as a platform to dive into the water and carry out the works. Gradually, large sections of the sheet piling were cut away and removed by the Scheldemond’s HIAB crane.

baynard-house-livetts_2

This removal happened very successfully over the course of two weeks.

Marine Coordinator Ed Livett commented: “The Scheldemond I once again showed her versatility and suitability for these types of jobs. Her ample deckspace and on board HIAB was crucial in the successful operations at Baynard House.”

For more information about civil engineering on the River Thames, please visit our Civil Engineering page.


Share this on...